Today we have some interesting ghee nutrition facts, including how it can increase the effectiveness and absorption of healthful herbs

There are a variety of ghee nutrition facts to share, including some scientific research that highlights the benefits of ghee for the digestive system.

Before we get to research, I want to share some ghee nutrition facts that may resonate with practitioners of the Whole30® diet.

The Whole30® has gained popularity with many health-minded individuals who want to focus on whole foods while eliminating foods that could be triggering undesirable responses, like inflammation or a damaged gut. The foods that can be eaten during this diet include vegetables, fruits, unprocessed meats, seafood, eggs, nuts and seeds, coffee, and some oils.

The Whole30® also involves a 30-day journey of avoiding a variety of foods, including:

  • Alcohol, in all forms (even for cooking)
  • Sugar, real or artificial
  • Baked goods
  • Dairy*
  • Grains
  • Legumes
  • Anything containing carrageenan, MSG, or sulfites
  • Junk food

Notice there is an asterisk after dairy. The reason for using an asterisk is because ghee, even though it is a dairy product, is approved for the Whole30® challenge. The Whole30® states that ghee is allowed because it has the milk proteins, or milk solids, removed, which are considered the problematic components of dairy products from a digestive standpoint.

If you’re embarking on your own Whole30® experience, be sure to add some ghee into your diet!

Digestive restoration is part of the ghee nutrition facts to understand

Now let’s dive into some ghee nutrition facts by looking at a scientific discussion. Here is an excerpt from a study entitled The effect of ghee (clarified butter) on serum lipid levels and microsomal lipid peroxidation:

“Many Ayurvedic preparations are made by cooking herbs into ghee. Ghee carries the therapeutic properties of herbs to all the body’s tissues. It is an excellent anupana (vehicle) for transporting herbs to the deeper tissue layers of the body.[3] Proper digestion, absorption, and delivery to a target organ system are crucial in obtaining the maximum benefit from any therapeutic formulation; the lipophilic action of ghee facilitates transportation to a target organ and final delivery inside the cell since the cell membrane also contains lipid.[4] A study that compared different forms of herbs and herb extracts found that the efficacy increased when they were used with ghee, compared to usage in powder or tablet form.[5]”

Interestingly enough, this research shows that herbs added to ghee are able to go deeper into body tissues for better absorption and movement throughout the body. Not only is ghee able to restore intestinal walls that have been damaged — allowing for a greater ability to uptake nutrients — it can also serve as a vessel for helping other healthful constituents, like herbs, reach their maximum potential. This is a great benefit of ghee on the digestive system. 

Furthermore, this is showing that ghee butter benefits can be enhanced by adding healthful herbs to the ghee. If you already use medicinal herbs at home, then you can infuse them into your ghee for added benefits. And both ghee and herbs can be used at part of the Whole30® challenge.

For an added layer of protection to your gut (and a delicious flavor), try our Rosemary Garlic Ghee and our Turmeric Spiced Ghee. Rosemary is also considered anti-inflammatory and has an affinity for gut health, including the ability to sooth a dysfunctional GI tract, and relieve bloating and gas. Garlic has a variety of benefits for the digestive system too, including its ability to help create enzymes necessary for digestion. Garlic is also anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, immune boosting, and full of antioxidants. Turmeric contains a compound called curcumin, which is also anti-inflammatory and high in antioxidants.

Try both of our Rosemary Garlic Ghee and Turmeric Spiced Ghee today! Or buy our regular ghee butter and add your own herbs and spices to it.

 

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